Wednesday, 23 January 2013

double knitting workshop

On Saturday, I tutored a two-stranded double knitting workshop for the Blue Mountains group of the Knitters’ Guild of NSW.

Double knitting can mean one of three things:
  1. a term for the weight of yarn; in US it’s called DK (double knitting), here in Australia we call the same weight 8ply
  2. using two yarns together to knit is sometimes, incorrectly, called double knitting
  3. a technique whereby a two-sided fabric is produced
It is the latter technique which was the subject of my workshop.

This is the sample I designed and knitted in DK pure wool (unblocked); the participants were given this pattern in the workshop. The finished size is 10.5cm x 12cm (4” x 4.5”) so it could be used as a coaster.
2013 double knitted coaster light ground2013 double knitted coaster dark ground

Below are the other samples I have knitted. The first is also in DK wool. I can only take credit for the knitting of this one; it was designed by Elizabeth Evans (Ravelry link). Ravelry tells me that I knitted this back in 2010.
2010 double knit teapot potholder blue on beige
The other side is a beige teapot on a blue background.

The second sample was designed by Laura Ponce de León as the Cubic Scarf (Ravelry link) but I felt it was too thick to wear as a scarf here in Australia. Perhaps in climates where it gets very cold, one could wear it as a scarf. Also my knitting created a very dense fabric which didn’t have the drape I prefer for a scarf. I intended it to be a bib for Older Grandson (who had not yet been born when I started it in 2010) but being 4ply (fingering) acrylic it had zero absorbency, something I soon realised was needed in a bib!
2010 double knitting scarf bib
I also showed the workshop participants this teeny pincushion/needle-holder I knitted as a prototype in December 2012. It is knitted in the double knitting technique but in a single strand of sock weight yarn on 2.00mm (US 0) needles.
  2012 mini double knitted pin cushion
I am thinking I will make a bunch of these (perhaps a little bit bigger) for my classmates Christmas gifts in 2013. Don’t be fooled by the size of the photo. That is a Size 8 embroidery needle.This one is a perfect size (4cm – 1.5”) to fit into my embroidery kit which is contained in this cute little tin, which itself is about 10cm x 6cm (4” x 2.5”).
Guterman tin
Now I’m hooked on the possibilities of double knitting – a reversible hat, a bag, and a drapey scarf.

Would it be possible to do it in entrelac?
What  about lace? The decreases may be an issue!

So many ideas – so little time! So many UFOs/WiPs to complete!



11 comments:

  1. I am hooked on the double knitting-my headband is finally looking like it is supposed to-I am on try #4 so it ought to! I love your bib that won't be a bib=the pattern is lovely! What fun it is to explore this technique-there are more patterns coming available on Ravelry for more projects! So many ideas, so little time!

    ReplyDelete
  2. You certainly are a super knitter, Lynne. Love those little houses!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Very neat! This is one of those techniques that is definitely on my to try someday list. It always seems like it'll end up making something to thick to be practical here in SoCal, but I like what you've done.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Love your little house and tea pot. Teeny needle holder is sweet. Now that I've had two knitting lessons, I'm beginning to recognize some of your stitches and truly appreciate the difficulty of your projects.

    ReplyDelete
  5. The world is our oyster when it comes to our choices!! It's great when you find something new to get hooked on. Have fun.
    Cheers, Anita.

    ReplyDelete
  6. The double knitting is amazing.

    ReplyDelete
  7. It's such a neat technique and always surprises me as the two sides take shape. Now I want to knit a little project using this technique because I haven't done it for ages but I'm going to be good and put it on my February list.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I always wondered how those double sided knits where made. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Oh, you are so good! Love these...both the house and the teapot are symbols I love! I bet you are a wonderful teacher!

    ReplyDelete
  10. The cubes are just great. I don't think I could ever knit that well LOL.

    ReplyDelete
  11. oh, my goodness, that looks so complicated but really neat looking.

    ReplyDelete

Hi. Thanks for dropping in. I look forward to reading your comment.
I like to answer comments; if you are a "no-reply blogger" I will try my best to get back to you on your blog! I'm not on FaceBook so I can't contact you there!

Blog Archive